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DETAIL FOR 2007 House ROLL CALL VOTE 768
Vote Date: 31-Jul-2007
Yeas: 225, Nays: 199
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Associated Builders and Contractors
H.R. 2831 Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act.
The Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act is an extreme piece of legislation that would effectively eliminate the statute of limitations from employment discrimination claims. The consequences would mean countless claims being filed based on alleged acts that could have occurred decades ago, well after memories have faded, documents and witnesses have disappeared, and businesses have changed hands or no longer exist.

American Civil Liberties Union
Eliminating Pay Discrimination.
The House passed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act (H.R. 2831). This group supported the legislation, which would restore protections in wage discrimination laws that have been bedrock civil rights principles for decades and were undermined by a recent Supreme Court decision. The legislation addresses wage disparities based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, and disability, clarifying that such discrimination is not a one-time occurrence that starts and ends with a pay decision, but that each paycheck represents a continuing violation by an employer.

NAACP
Restoring the rights of workers to pursue anti-wage discrimination remedies.
Final passage of legislation reasserting Congress' original intent in the 1964 Civil Rights Act and allowing employees to file charges of pay discrimination within 180 days of the last received pay check affected by the discrimination. The legislation passed.

AFL-CIO
The Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act—H.R. 2831.
The bill would overturn a 2007 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that greatly restricted the ability of workers to sue employers for illegal pay discrimination under Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Lilly Ledbetter worked for Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. for more than 20 years but was paid less than men who were doing the same job as she was. It wasn't until many years after she started work that she discovered the pay discrimination and then she filed suit. The court ruled that a worker has only 180 days from the date of the first discriminatory pay check to file suit, even if the worker has no way of knowing for months or even years that the pay disparity is the result of illegal discrimination. H.R. 2831 passed.

Americans for Democratic Action
HR 2831. Wage Discrimination.
Passage of a bill responding to the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire Company, which said that charges of wage discrimination must be filed within 180 days of the initial discriminatory act, regardless of whether the employee had any idea that he or she was being discriminated against. The bill would amend the 1964 Civil Rights Act to allow employees to fi le charges of pay discrimination within 180 days of their receipt of a paycheck affected by the alleged discriminatory decision. The bill would also clarify that an employee is entitled to up to two years of back-pay if it is determined that discrimination occurred.

U.S. Chamber of Commerce
Ledbetter Fair Pay Act— H.R. 2831.

Despite strong opposition by this group, the House passed H.R. 2831, the Ledbetter Fair Pay Act. This bill would amend Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and several other anti-discrimination laws to effectively abolish the statute of limitations in many cases.

H.R. 2831 is purported to overturn the Supreme Court’s recent decision in Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., which rejected the “paycheck theory” of compensation discrimination that would have permitted claims to be filed many years after an alleged act of discrimination occurs. If signed into law, H.R. 2831 would not only reverse this common sense decision, but it could be applied broadly and create a situation where claims could be filed decades after an allegedly discriminatory act occurred.

This legislation is now awaiting action in the Senate. This group will continue to oppose this wrongheaded approach and work to preserve the intent of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act.



American Association of University Women
The Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2007 (H.R. 2831).

The House passed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2007 (H.R. 2831). Introduced by Chairman George Miller (D-CA), the legislation codifies the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and court interpretations of pay discrimination law that had been in place for almost 40 years before the Supreme Court’s decision in Ledbetter v. Goodyear.

The Supreme Court’s decision in Ledbetter severely limits the ability of victims of pay discrimination to sue under Title VII. This group believes that this decision is inconsistent with congressional intent, prior legal precedents, and longstanding EEOC practice. Under this new rule, most employees have to file a pay discrimination claim within 180 days of their last discriminatory pay decision, as opposed to 180 days from a discriminatory paycheck. This group believes that the Court’s decision ignores the realities of today’s workplace; employees generally don’t know enough about what coworkers earn or how pay decisions are made to file a complaint in such a short period of time.

This group is pleased that the House moved quickly to address this conceptually wrongheaded decision. The House bill would amend Title VII to clarify that a pay discrimination claim accrues when a pay decision is made, when an employee is subject to that decision, or at any time an employee is injured by it.



National Federation of Independent Business
Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2007.
This bill passed in the House. This bill which would amend the 1964 Civil Rights Act to allow employees to file charges of pay discrimination within 180 days of the last received paycheck affected by the alleged discriminatory decision. The bill would clarify that an employee is entitled to up to two years of back-pay if it is determined that discrimination occurred.

International Union, UAW
House Approves Bill to Restore Remedies for Equal Pay Violations.
In the Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber case, the Supreme Court held that the statute of limitations for bringing pay discrimination claims under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 begins to run from the day a pay decision is originally made, rather than from when the employee is subject to the decision or injured by it. This terrible decision was a sharp departure from precedent, and would greatly limit the ability of workers to seek redress for unlawful pay discrimination.It was approved by the House.

American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees
Helping Victims of Employment Discrimination.
The House approved the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2007 (H.R. 2831), a bill that would reverse a Supreme Court decision limiting the time that workers have to sue their employers for pay discrimination.

BIPAC
H.R.2831, On Passage.
Vote on H.R. 283. This legislation seeks to reverse the Supreme Court's 2007 "Ledbetter" decision and expand employers' exposure to discrimination claims.

The National Association of Manufacturers
H.R.2831, On Passage.
Increasing Discrimination Claims Against Employers. Vote on H.R. 2831, the Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, which seeks to reverse the Supreme Court's 2007 Ledbetter decision and to overhaul major civil rights laws by effectively eliminating the time limits for filing discrimination claims against employers. This group opposed the bill, which would significantly broaden employers' exposure to pay discrimination claims under civil rights laws.

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